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Screening and Discussion of Frankenstein (1931)

  • 2019.04.09
  • Recruitment Activity
In conjunction with courses “GED 2401: A Century of Film Art” and “GED 3308: Man and Society in Western and Chinese Science Fiction,” Dr. Booth Wilson and Dr. Kuan-yen Liu co-host the screening and discussion of the science fiction film Frankenstein (1931).

Topic:             Screening and Discussion of Frankenstein (1931)

Time&Date:  19:00-20:30, April 10, 2019 (Wednesday)

Venue:            Zhixin 111    

Speaker:         Dr. Booth Wilson and Dr. Kuan-yen Liu

Language:      English

 

Abstract:

In conjunction with courses “GED 2401: A Century of Film Art” and “GED 3308: Man and Society in Western and Chinese Science Fiction,” Dr. Booth Wilson and Dr. Kuan-yen Liu co-host the screening and discussion of the science fiction film Frankenstein (1931).

Before the screening of the movie, Dr. Liu will give a short introduction to Mary Shelley’s magnum opus Frankenstein in relation to British Romanticism, Christian theology and the history of Western science as well as the shaping of the genre of “science fiction.” Next, Dr. Wilson will discuss the influential film adaptation in the context of the Hollywood studio system and the emergence of the genre of the “horror film.”

 

Speaker:

Dr. Booth Wilson is a Lecturer in General Education at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (Shenzhen) and he is teaching “GED 2401: A Century of Film Art” this semester. He received a PhD from the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on film history, aesthetics, and theory. He is currently at work on a monograph on the career of Russian director Yakov Protazanov. His work has appeared in Animation Journal and Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema and is forthcoming in Cinema Journal

Dr. Kuan-yen Liu is a Lecturer in General Education at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (Shenzhen) and he is teaching “GED 3308: Man and Society in Western and Chinese Science Fiction” this semester. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Santa Barbara where he specialized in Victorian Thought and Literature, Late-Qing Chinese Thought and Literature, and Philosophy of Science. He earned his B.A. from National Chengchi University in Taiwan, with a double major in English Literature and Philosophy as well as minors in History and Chinese Literature. Two of his book chapters on the intersections between Victorian biology and Chinese philosophy in the Late-Qing period are forthcoming in a book collection published by Springer.

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